Conflictos militares en Asia

Todo sobre lo conflictos militares actuales o de otras épocas

Moderadores: poliorcetes, Lepanto, Orel, Edu

Re: Conflictos militares en Asia

Notapor Tercio norte el Mar May 05, 2020 2:16 pm

Esto ya no lo pongo en las noticias del bicho..... esto es otra cosa, hablan de conflicto armado entre China y EEUU, que sera que no, pero se están calentando los ánimos, aparte de EEUU, también Macron esta poniendo el foco en la actuación de China, Alemania a exigido a China que aclare el origen del virus (por lo que parece no aceptan la teoría oficial de la oms), Australia...... en general el gigante asiático esta muy en entredicho.

https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.elpais ... ee-uu.html
si vis pacem para bellum
Tercio norte
 
Mensajes: 2189
Registrado: Lun Dic 21, 2015 7:52 pm

Re: Conflictos militares en Asia

Notapor ruso el Mar May 05, 2020 2:55 pm

A China ya llevan un tiempo buscándole un lugar como enemigo de occidente desde tiempo antes del coronavirus.

Por cierto, lo que diga la OMS ¿tiene alguna credibilidad?, es que me fío menos de éstos que incluso de nuestro gobierno.
Avatar de Usuario
ruso
 
Mensajes: 4822
Registrado: Lun Jul 28, 2008 6:58 pm

Re: Conflictos militares en Asia

Notapor Tercio norte el Mar May 05, 2020 4:29 pm

Estos quienes son, EEUU, Francia, Alemania, Australia..... o la OMS, te lo pregunto de verdad, no me ha quedado claro. De todas formas respondo.

Si no te crees a los primeros, pues ni si ni no, a ciegas no les creo, pero si la posición es unánime... pues si lo tomaría por bueno.

Si te refieres a la oms, no, ni de coña, para mi credibilidad 0, y más con el director que tienen, entre 0 y nada por que no se puede menos.
si vis pacem para bellum
Tercio norte
 
Mensajes: 2189
Registrado: Lun Dic 21, 2015 7:52 pm

Re: Conflictos militares en Asia

Notapor ruso el Mar May 05, 2020 4:32 pm

Con "éstos" me refería a los de la OMS, pero vamos, de EE.UU., Francia, Alemania y demás tampoco es que me fíe, ni de Rusia, ni de China...
Avatar de Usuario
ruso
 
Mensajes: 4822
Registrado: Lun Jul 28, 2008 6:58 pm

Re: Conflictos militares en Asia

Notapor Tercio norte el Mié May 06, 2020 2:35 pm

si vis pacem para bellum
Tercio norte
 
Mensajes: 2189
Registrado: Lun Dic 21, 2015 7:52 pm

Re: Conflictos militares en Asia

Notapor Kique el Vie May 08, 2020 7:44 am

Does the global pandemic open new South China Sea opportunities for Beijing? Not really.
China is just continuing its longtime strategy
https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics ... ot-really/

The South China Sea is becoming even choppier. Last month, China started to conduct a seismic survey within Malaysia’s exclusive economic zone (EEZ), and a Vietnamese fishing boat sank near the Paracel Islands after a collision with a China Coast Guard vessel.

A number of recent analyses have emphasized that China is seizing pandemic-created opportunities to improve its position in the South China Sea as other countries are distracted or otherwise unable to respond. A key implication of such claims is that absent the pandemic, China would have acted differently and perhaps with more restraint.

My research — and a rundown of Chinese actions since the pandemic — suggest these moves demonstrate continuity in China’s behavior, not opportunism. Here’s what you need to know.

1. China’s South China Sea strategy hasn’t changed

Before the pandemic, China’s recent actions in the South China Sea have sought to assert historic rights in these waters. But the idea of historic rights clashes with the definition of the EEZ under the U.N. Convention on the Law of the Sea, which gives coastal states the exclusive right to resources in a zone 200 nautical miles from their shores. In 2016, a tribunal formed to hear a case brought by the Philippines ruled that any claim to historic rights in the South China Sea (implied by the “nine-dash line” on Chinese maps) was invalid.

When rejecting the tribunal’s ruling, Beijing doubled down by issuing a rare government statement that openly declared that “China has historic rights in the South China Sea.” Although Beijing has not yet defined the content of these rights, they probably focus on “fishing rights, navigation rights and priority rights of resource development,” according to one authoritative Chinese analyst.

To assert these historic rights in the past few years, China uses the three large forward-operating bases it created atop reefs in the Spratly Islands through vast land reclamation in 2014-2015, to enhance its physical presence and power projection in these waters.

2. These latest altercations precede the pandemic

In December 2019, China and Indonesia faced off over a Chinese fishing fleet operating near Indonesia’s Natuna Island in the far southwestern reaches of the South China Sea. The standoff continued through the end of January, with China Coast Guard ships escorting Chinese fishing vessels as well as displays of resolve by Indonesia's armed forces.

The confrontation between China and Indonesia was only the most recent example of a much longer struggle over fishing in these waters, which began to increase in 2016. China considers the area to be its traditional fishing grounds. But the waters in question are located within Indonesia’s EEZ, which means Jakarta enjoys exclusive rights to the resources under international law.

3. Spring fishing season often sparks new tensions

On April 2, a Vietnamese fishing vessel fishing near Woody Island in the Paracels sank after colliding with a China Coast Guard vessel. Vietnam claims sovereignty over the Paracels — which China has occupied in their entirety since 1974. These types of tragic events often occur around these islands, especially during peak fishing season each spring. In March 2019, for example, another Vietnamese fishing boat sank after a confrontation with a Chinese law enforcement vessel near Discovery Reef. This latest collision last month reflects the cyclical dynamics between China and Vietnam in this area, and China’s willingness to respond harshly.

4. China has also interfered with other countries’ oil and gas exploration

Also in April, a Chinese seismic survey ship, the Haiyang Dizhi 8, began operations in Malaysia’s EEZ under the protection of China Coast Guard vessels. This was not a new effort to assert rights to oil and gas — in 2017 and 2018, China pressured Vietnam to halt exploration activities around Vanguard Bank. In 2019, China dispatched Coast Guard vessels to patrol around and, at times, harass drilling operations within Vietnam and Malaysia’s EEZ. Indeed, the same Chinese vessel conducted an extensive survey inside Vietnam’s EEZ from early July to late October 2019.

An additional element is that Malaysia increased its own oil and gas exploration activities last fall. In October 2019, the West Capella drilling rig, contracted by the Malaysian state-owned oil company Petronas, began operations in several different blocks within Malaysia’s EEZ and continental shelf. In December 2019, Malaysia submitted another claim to the United Nations for an additional extended continental shelf in the center of the South China Sea that covers the seabed around all the Spratly Islands, directly challenging China’s claims.

China’s response repeated its approach with Vietnam in 2019. Starting in December 2019, China Coast Guard vessels have patrolled around the West Capella rig, at times intimidating service vessels. Then, in mid-April, China’s Haiyang Dizhi 8 initiated a survey within Malaysia’s EEZ near where West Capella was drilling.

Also in April, China’s Ministry of Civil Affairs announced the establishment of two administrative districts within Sansha City, the city Beijing established in 2012 to administer the islands and waters in the South China Sea. Based on Woody Island, the Paracels District covers the Paracel Islands as well as Macclesfield Bank and Scarborough Shoal. Based on Fiery Cross Reef, the Spratlys District covers the Spratlys. Although possibly an instance of opportunism, Beijing apparently created these two new districts to demonstrate that “our determination and will to safeguard territorial sovereignty are unshakable,” as one Chinese analyst notes.

Can we expect to see more of these moves?

Taken together, China’s actions in the South China Sea reflect continuity, not opportunism. Similarly, elements of the U.S. approach in the region also reflect continuity, despite the pandemic. Since January, for example, the U.S. Navy has conducted four freedom-of-navigation operations around the Paracels and the Spratlys. And the U.S. Navy also announced three transits of warships through the Taiwan Strait in January, February and April 2020. Both kinds of U.S. actions appear consistent with the tempo of operations before the pandemic.

So what explains China’s actions in the South China Sea during the pandemic? China may consider that pressing its claims is more important than pausing to focus on the pandemic or improve ties with other states. Also, because Chinese strategic thought links internal strife with external challenges (the idea of “neiluan waihuan”), China’s leaders may believe that any pause in behavior might signal weakness or a shift in China’s bottom line in the South China Sea.





Avatar de Usuario
Kique
 
Mensajes: 1881
Registrado: Dom Dic 02, 2018 12:11 am

Re: Conflictos militares en Asia

Notapor Kique el Lun May 11, 2020 10:48 am

Parece que China está comenzando una destrucción de arrecifes marinos del sur de China en el Océano Índico. #Feydhoofinolhu (4.211417 ° N 73.484213 ° E) supuestamente fue comprado (arrendamientos) por una empresa china en 2016:
https://twitter.com/adamiington/status/ ... 2632916992

Gobierno de Maldivas vendido #Feydhoofinolhu a una empresa china por $ 4 millones sin oferta y la empresa no se revela!
Imagen


Este proyecto está a solo 600 km de la India.

#Feydhoofinolhu cerca #Male , #Maldives arrendado en 2017 por 50 años para #China ve un dramático lavado de cara (2020) cortesía de la recuperación de tierras ... expandiendo no solo su tamaño sino también el #OnebeltOneRoad huella en el #IndianOcean#StringsOfPearls

https://twitter.com/detresfa_/status/12 ... 4792810498


Imagen
Avatar de Usuario
Kique
 
Mensajes: 1881
Registrado: Dom Dic 02, 2018 12:11 am

Re: Conflictos militares en Asia

Notapor Kique el Mié May 13, 2020 9:20 am

China sigue a lo suyo construyendo sus islas en al sur del mar de China.
Satellites Show Scale Of Suspected Illegal Dredging In South China Sea
https://www.forbes.com/sites/hisutton/2 ... 6bfe494310


Imagen
Avatar de Usuario
Kique
 
Mensajes: 1881
Registrado: Dom Dic 02, 2018 12:11 am

Re: Conflictos militares en Asia

Notapor Kique el Mié May 13, 2020 9:35 am

Imagen
Avatar de Usuario
Kique
 
Mensajes: 1881
Registrado: Dom Dic 02, 2018 12:11 am

Re: Conflictos militares en Asia

Notapor Tercio norte el Mar May 19, 2020 2:28 pm

http://galaxiamilitar.es/la-marina-de-e ... e-a-china/

EEUU de maniobras submarinas por el pacifico con la vista puesta en China.
si vis pacem para bellum
Tercio norte
 
Mensajes: 2189
Registrado: Lun Dic 21, 2015 7:52 pm

Re: Conflictos militares en Asia

Notapor Lepanto el Mié May 20, 2020 5:46 pm

¿Qué pasaría si, a través de un "error de cálculo", China y Estados Unidos se enfrentaran militarmente en la región del Indo-Pacífico en 2030? Para responder a esta pregunta, el Pentágono se ha involucrado en "Juegos de guerra", destinados a examinar escenarios posibles o incluso improbables desde todos los ángulos. Y, según el diario The Times, el resultado final es: las fuerzas estadounidenses serían "aplastadas".

"Todas las simulaciones de la amenaza planteada por China para 2030 han terminado en la derrota de Estados Unidos", confirmó Bonnie Glaser, directora del proyecto China Power en el Centro de Estudios Estratégicos e Internacionales en Washington, en el diario británico. Y agregó que el caso más problemático es el de Taiwán, porque podría degenerar en guerra, sabiendo que el presidente chino, Xi Jinping, no oculta sus intenciones con respecto a la isla, considerada en Beijing como un "Provincia rebelde".

En una entrevista reciente, el general Qiao Liang, coautor del ensayo "The War Out of Bounds" tocó este punto. "También debemos preguntarnos si es probable que el tema de la 'independencia de Taiwán nos lleve demasiado lejos si estamos considerando la guerra para resolver este problema. Con el apoyo de los Estados Unidos y los países occidentales, ¿solo podemos hacer algo? No necesariamente. Para mantener la "independencia de Taiwán", además de las opciones de guerra, se deben considerar más opciones. Podemos pensar en formas de actuar en la gran área gris entre la guerra y la paz, e incluso podemos considerar formas más específicas, como el lanzamiento de operaciones militares que no comenzarán la guerra,

En cualquier caso, lo cierto es que China no dudó en mostrar sus músculos durante la crisis vinculada a la epidemia de Covid-19 ... mientras que la Marina de los Estados Unidos se encontró en dificultades con la contaminación del USS Theodore Roosevelt. Además, las tensiones, ya sea en el Mar del Sur de China o en el Estrecho de Taiwán, no han disminuido ni un ápice ... Lo que ha aumentado, precisamente, el riesgo de error de cálculo.

Sea como fuere, según fuentes del "Times", los "juegos de guerra" del Pentágono revelaron, como era de esperar, que la acumulación de misiles balísticos de mediano alcance por parte de China estaba poniendo en peligro las bases americanas de Guam u Okinawa, o incluso las Task Force de la US Navy.

La aparición de armas hipersónicas, la capacidad de denegación y prohibición de acceso y el salto cualitativo de los barcos militares chinos hacen que las fuerzas estadounidenses no estén garantizadas de ninguna manera para tener una ventaja operativa decisiva. Esto es lo que el almirante Harry Harris ya había señalado cuando era jefe del mando militar estadounidense para la región del Indo-Pacífico [USINDOPACOM] en 2017.

"La década de 2020 será decisiva ya que China comenzará a tener la capacidad de desafiar a Estados Unidos en el mar y en el aire, también en el espacio y el ciberespacio". Esto podría empujar a Beijing a actuar en el Mar del Sur de China y contra Taiwán si los estadounidenses no están listos para enfrentarse al desafío ”, comentó el Dr. Malcolm Davis del Instituto de Política Estratégica Australiana [ASPI] en la prensa australiana.

Dicho esto, la simulación del Pentágono solo confirma un estudio publicado el año pasado por el Centro de Estudios sobre Estados Unidos de la Universidad de Sydney. Así, este último cuestionó la superioridad militar estadounidense en la región del Indo-Pacífico y afirmó que la capacidad de Estados Unidos para mantener un equilibrio favorable de fuerzas era "cada vez más incierta".

"Muchas bases estadounidenses y aliadas en la región del Indo-Pacífico están expuestas a un posible ataque con misiles por parte de China y carecen de infraestructura reforzada. Las municiones y los suministros desplegados en el futuro no se adaptan a las necesidades de la guerra y, la capacidad logística de Estados Unidos ha disminuido drásticamente de forma preocupante", señaló el estudio.
Aquí
¡¡ Además del foro, tenemos un podcast, óyelo !!
https://www.ivoox.com/podcast-portierra ... 223_1.html

y recuerda nuestro patreon para actualizar el foro y crecer
https://www.patreon.com/portierramaryaire
Avatar de Usuario
Lepanto
Moderador
 
Mensajes: 11227
Registrado: Sab Feb 12, 2005 11:31 pm

Re: Conflictos militares en Asia

Notapor Kique el Vie May 22, 2020 8:44 pm

El primer ministro chino Li Keqiang dejó fuera la palabra "pacífico" el viernes al referirse al deseo de Pekín de "reunificarse" con la reclamada Taiwán, un aparente cambio de política que se produce a medida que los lazos con Taipei continúan en una espiral descendente.

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-chin ... SKBN22Y06S
Avatar de Usuario
Kique
 
Mensajes: 1881
Registrado: Dom Dic 02, 2018 12:11 am

Re: Conflictos militares en Asia

Notapor Kique el Sab May 23, 2020 11:48 am

Reportaje sobre las reclamaciones de China en el sur del mar de la china.
https://www.rfa.org/english/news/special/scs-80/


Algunas imágenes:

Imagen
Imagen
Imagen
Imagen
Imagen
Avatar de Usuario
Kique
 
Mensajes: 1881
Registrado: Dom Dic 02, 2018 12:11 am

Re: Conflictos militares en Asia

Notapor Lepanto el Sab May 23, 2020 5:30 pm

Lo único que se aprobó en el último congreso del partido comunista chino celebrado estos días, es el presupuesto para defensa, del resto ni pío. La asamblea popular renunció a dictar un objetivo de crecimiento económico para el 2020, según cuenta el ejercito verá crecer su presupuesto en un 6,6% hasta los 165.000 millones de euros.
¡¡ Además del foro, tenemos un podcast, óyelo !!
https://www.ivoox.com/podcast-portierra ... 223_1.html

y recuerda nuestro patreon para actualizar el foro y crecer
https://www.patreon.com/portierramaryaire
Avatar de Usuario
Lepanto
Moderador
 
Mensajes: 11227
Registrado: Sab Feb 12, 2005 11:31 pm

Re: Conflictos militares en Asia

Notapor Kique el Lun May 25, 2020 11:03 pm

Iniciativa de Disuasión del Pacífico: EE.UU. se prepara contra China

https://thepoliticalroom.com/iniciativa ... tra-china/
Avatar de Usuario
Kique
 
Mensajes: 1881
Registrado: Dom Dic 02, 2018 12:11 am

PrevioSiguiente

Volver a Conflictos militares

¿Quién está conectado?

Usuarios navegando por este Foro: No hay usuarios registrados visitando el Foro y 4 invitados