¿Es el 5.56 OTAN suficiente para nuestros soldados?

Ejércitos de tierra de todo el mundo y elementos que los componen

Moderadores: poliorcetes, Lepanto, Orel, Edu

¿Es el 5.56 OTAN suficiente para nuestros soldados?

Notapor poliorcetes el Jue Sep 03, 2009 10:31 am

Abro este hilo tras leer un artí­culo que sustenta con una buena colección de hechos un concepto básico: ¿Cómo una munición diseñada para cazar alimañas (varmint) puede transmutarse en munición de infanterí­a?

Es largo, pero merece mucho la pena.

http://www.americanthinker.com/2004/08/ ... am_ki.html

August 24, 2004
The Last 'Big Lie' of Vietnam Kills U. S. Soldiers in Iraq
By Maj. Anthony F. Milavic, USMC (Ret.)

At a Vietnam Special Forces base during 1964, I watched a U. S. soldier fire 15 rounds of .223 caliber ammunition into a tethered goat from an AR—15 rifle; moments after the last round hit, the goat fell over. Looking at the dead goat, I saw many little bullet entry—holes on one side; and when we turned him over, I saw many little bullet exit—holes on the other side. Over time, those observations were confirmed and reconfirmed, revealing that the stories we were told on the lethality of the .223 caliber cartridge were fabrications. Those false reports drove the adoption of the .223 caliber cartridge as the 5.56mm NATO cartridge and, ever since, Americans have been sent to war with a cartridge deficient in combat lethality; a deficiency that has recently caused the deaths of U.S. soldiers in Iraq.

What is efficient combat lethality? The book Black Hawk Down quotes SFC Paul Howe's description of SFC Randy Shughart, a soldier who elected to carry the 7.62mm M—14 into the urban battlefield of Somalia in 1993 rather than the 5.56mm CAR—15 (M—16—variant):

'His rifle may have been heavier and comparatively awkward and delivered a mean recoil, but it damn sure knocked a man down with one bullet, and in combat, one shot was all you got. You shoot a guy, you want to see him go down; you don't want to be guessing for the next five hours whether you hit him, or whether he's still waiting for you in the weeds.' [1]

With the wisdom of a combat veteran, Howe describes the lethality necessary for a cartridge in combat—one—round knockdown power.

How did we get from military cartridges with proven one—round knockdown power such as the 30—06 and 7.62mm to the 5.56mm? The journey starts with the term 'tumbling.' This term has been associated with the .223 cal./5.56mm cartridge, since early in its marketing as a potential military cartridge to this day. The very word, tumbling, prompts images of a bullet traveling end over end through the human body in 360—degree loops: in reality, it does not move this way at all.


Dr. Martin L. Fackler, COL., USA (Ret.) served as a surgeon in Vietnam during 1968 and, subsequently, pursued the research of terminal ballistics by observing the effects of bullets fired into blocks of ballistic gelatin. In 'Wounding patterns for military rifle bullets,' he reports the observation that 'all' non—deforming pointed bullets—this included the 30—06 and 7.62mm military full—metal jacket bullets—— 'yawed' 180 degrees while passing through the gelatin to exit base—forward; i.e., heaviest end forward. The 5.56mm projectile acted in the same manner with a very precise exception: These rounds 'yawed' to 90—degrees, and then fragmented at their weakened serrated band (cannelure) into two or more pieces when fired into ballistic gelatin. However, the 5.56mm projectile does NOT always yaw or fragment. Under field conditions, the probability of these effects is reduced by the following factors:

——The round strikes the target at less than 2700 feet per second. That velocity is reduced by: the farther the range to the target, the greater reduction in velocity; shortened weapon barrel length as is the case with the shorter M—4 carbine; and/or, manufacturing variances in the cartridge.

——Variances in human body thickness and flesh density and consistency.

In those cases, the bullet neither yaws nor fragments and causes only a pencil size hole through the body; i.e., small hole in, small hole out. Neither Dr. Fackler nor anyone else has provided any empirical data or estimate on the incidence of the 5.56mm yaw/fragmentation effect on enemy soldiers. Conversely, since first used by Americans in combat, there has been a consistent observation from the field—enemy soldiers continue to fire their weapons after being hit by multiple 5.56mm bullets; evidently, no yaw/fragmentation effect. Nevertheless, the term 'tumble' was apparently derived from idealized yaw action and, as suggested by the following, was chosen in lieu of the word yaw because it would 'sell' better. [2]

The book, The Black Rifle, M16 Retrospective by Edward C. Ezell and R. Blake Stevens, ' . . . is, so far as [the authors] could make it so, the truth about the controversial 5.56mm caliber AR—15 (M16)—what it is, what it is not, where it came from, and why.'

Edward C. Ezell, Ph.D., now deceased, was the Curator/Supervisor of the Division of Armed Forces History, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC and the editor of perhaps the world's most famous gun book, Small Arms of the World. The Black Rifle contains one of the earliest characterizations that the .223 cal. bullet tumbled in a brochure produced by Colt's Patent Fire Arms Manufacturing Company, Inc. The caption written by the book's authors reads, 'From the first Colt AR—15 brochure, produced in a desperate attempt to interest somebody — anybody — in the merits of the AR—15's 'unmatched superiority.'' In one of the three internal brochure illustrations is text reading, in part, 'On impact the tumbling action of the .223 caliber ammunition increases effectiveness.' [3]

In 1961, Colt's did get somebody's attention. The Advanced Research Project Agency (ARPA) of the Department of Defense (DoD) was enjoined by the Kennedy Administration to explore how the United States could support a foreign ally in a 'limited' war. In the spring of 1961, ARPA's Project AGILE was implemented to supply 'research and engineering support for the military and paramilitary forces engaged in or threatened by conflict in remote areas of the world.' In October of 1961, ARPA provided ten Colt's AR—15's to Vietnamese Forces in Saigon to conduct a limited test. The Black Rifle remarks of this test, 'The number of rifles might have been small, but the enthusiastic reaction of the Vietnamese and their American advisors alike who handled and fired the AR—15s was just as [Colt's marketing agent] had predicted.' Armed with these positive results, ARPA succeeded in expanding the Project AGILE study by procuring 1,000 AR—15s for distribution among select Vietnamese units for field—testing. Ezell & Stevens write that this approval resulted in ' . . . saving Colt's from almost sure financial disaster and also setting the stage for the most influential yet controversial document so far in the history of the already controversial AR—15.' [4]

The purpose of this test, as set forth in, ARPA, 'Report of Task 13A, Test of ArmaLite Rifle, AR—15,' dated 31 July 1962, was ' . . . a comparison between the AR—15 and the M2 Carbine to determine which is a more suitable replacement for shoulder weapons in selected units of the Republic of Vietnam Armed Forces (RVNAF).' The Project AGILE results were summed up, in part, by ARPA as follows: 'The suitability of the AR—15 as the basic shoulder weapon for the Vietnamese has been established. For the type of conflict now occurring in Vietnam, the weapon was also found by its users and by MAAG advisors to be superior in virtually all respects to the M1 Rifle, M1 and M2 Carbines, Thompson Sub—Machine Gun, and Browning Automatic Rifle.' NOTE: This study and its recommendations concerned the suitability of the AR—15 for Vietnamese soldiers, who were described by the testers to be of 'small stature, body configuration and light weight,' NOT larger stature United States soldiers. [5]

In any case, the report was widely read and some of its components came under serious question, especially those purporting to describe the demonstrated lethality of the .223 caliber cartridge. The following are three such examples from the Project AGILE report:

Example 1. 'On 160900 June, one platoon from the 340 Ranger company was on a ground operation . . . and contacted 3 armed VC in heavily forested jungle.. . . At a distance of approximately 15 meters, one Ranger fired an AR—15 full automatic hitting one VC with 3 rounds with the first burst. One round in the head took it completely off. Another in the right arm, took it completely off. One round hit him in the right side, causing a hole about 5 inches in diameter.. . . (Rangers)'

Example 2. 'On 9 June a Ranger Platoon from the 40th Infantry Regt. Was given the mission of ambushing an estimated VC Company.. . .

1. Number of VC killed: 5 [Descriptions of the one—round killing wounds follow.]
1. Back wound, which caused the thoracic cavity to explode.
2. Stomach wound, which caused the abdominal cavity to explode.
3. Buttock wound, which destroyed all tissue of both buttocks.
4. Chest wound from right to left; destroyed the thoracic cavity.
5. Heel wound; the projectile entered the bottom of the right foot causing the leg to split from the foot to the hip.



These deaths were inflicted by the AR—15 and all were instantaneous except the buttock wound. He lived approximately five minutes. (7th Infantry Division)'

Example 3. 'On 13 April, a Special Forces team made a raid on a small village. In the raid, seven VC were killed. Two were killed by AR—15 fire. Range was 50 meters. One man was hit in the head; it looked like it exploded. A second man was hit in the chest, his back was one big hole. (VN Special Forces)' [6.]

The above 'field—reports' are incredulous on their face and some in DoD requested that these results be duplicated scientifically. The Army Wound Ballistics Laboratory at Edgewood Arsenal attempted to do just that. Using .223 caliber Remington ammunition provided by Colt's representative, they conducted their 'standard lethality trials that consisted of measuring the cavitational and other effects of firing at known distances into blocks of ballistic gelatin, and where necessary, anaesthetized goats.' They failed to duplicate the explosive effects reported by Project AGILE. In November 1962, the Army initiated 'Worldwide' tactical and technical tests of the AR—15 using U. S. soldiers. Edgewood was tasked to perform further lethality tests using modified .223 caliber ammunition. Ezell and Stevens describe the modifications: 'They had modified some 55—grain .223 caliber ball bullets of Remington manufacture by cutting approximately 1/4 inch off the nose and drilling a 3/32—inch—diameter hole about 1/4 inch deep into the lead core of each bullet.' The results? The authors continue, 'As it turned out, even the hollow—points failed to duplicate anything like the spectacular effects recorded by the Vietnamese unit commanders and their American advisors, which had subsequently been taken as fact and much used as propaganda.' [7.]

The .223 caliber cartridge was morphed into the 5.56mm NATO cartridge and adopted for the United States Service Rifle M—16 (formerly, AR—15) replacing the 7.62mm M—14. How could such propaganda have convinced the Department of Defense to adopt the .223 caliber cartridge? 'All this was inspired by the principle —— which is quite true in itself —— that in the big lie there is always a certain force of credibility; because the broad masses of a nation are always more easily corrupted in the deeper stata of their emotional nature than consciously or voluntarily, and thus in the primitive simplicity of their minds they more readily fall victims to the big lie than the small lie, since they themselves often tell small lies in little matters but would be ashamed to resort to large—scale falsehoods.'

Adolph Hitler, Mein Kampf [8.]



As is usually the case, a judgment based on lies was to adversely affect those at the 'pointy end of the spear.' American warriors reported enemy soldiers continuing to close and fire their weapons after sustaining multiple hits by 5.56mm bullets. This happened as early as 9 December 1965 in the official 'After Action Report of the Ia Drang Valley Operation . . ..' popularized by the movie and book We Were Soldiers Once . . . and Young. The commanding officer of the battalion engaged there, Col. Harold G. Moore, USA, writes of assaulting enemy soldiers being hit by 5.56mm rounds: "Even after being hit several times in the chest, many continued firing and moving for several more steps before dropping dead." [9.]

Later in that war, a similar experience is voiced by Col. John Hayworth, USA (Ret.): 'In one fire—fight, I saw my RTO place three rounds [of 5.56 mm] in the chest of a charging NVA regular at 50 yards. He kept firing his AK and never slowed down. At 30 yards, I hit him with a blast of double ought buck. It picked him up off his feet and he didn't get up again.' [10.]

In the aftermath of the Vietnam War, the DoD increased the weight of the 5.56mm 55—grain bullet (M193) to 62—grains, replaced some of its lead core with a tungsten steel core, painted the bullet tip green and designated the new cartridge M855. In 1991, the Pentagon sent its warriors to the Gulf War with this new green—tip cartridge. Maj. Howard Feldmeier, USMC (Ret.) was there: ' . . . several Marines commented that they had to shoot Iraqi soldiers 2—3 or more times with the 62—grain 5.56mm green tip ammo before they stopped firing back at them . . ..' That report is exemplified by one of an Iraqi officer who was thrown from his vehicle and set afire by an explosion: 'Somehow he managed to hold on to his AK—47. He also got up, still on fire, faced the firing line of Marines and charged forward firing his weapon from the hip. He didn't hit anyone but two Marines each nailed him with a three round burst from their M—16A2s. One burst hit him immediately above his heart, the other in his belly button. [He] . . . kept right on charging and firing until his magazine was empty. When he got up to the Marines two of them tackled him and rolled him in the sand to put out the fire. . . . He was quickly carried back to the battalion aid station . . .. The surgeons told me he certainly died of burns, but not necessarily from the six 5.56mm wounds . . ..' [11.]

In spite of the above 'lesson learned,' the DoD dispatched its warriors to combat in Somalia in 1993 with the same flawed 'green tip' cartridge as testified in Mark Bowden's book Black Hawk Down: 'His weapon was the most sophisticated infantry rifle in the world, a customized CAR—15, and he was shooting the army's new 5.56mm green tip round. . . . The bullet made a small, clean hole, and unless it happened to hit the heart or spine, it wasn't enough to stop a man in his tracks. Howe felt he had to hit a guy five or six times just to get his attention.'

The Pentagon remained unmoved by that experience of its warriors and continued to send them to war underpowered. On 4 April 2002, I received an e—mail from a trooper in Afghanistan who appeals, in part: 'The current—issue 62gr 5.56mm (223) round, especially when fired from the short—barreled, M—4 carbine, is proving itself (once again) to be woefully inadequate as [a] man stopper. Engagements at all ranges are requiring multiple, solid hits to permanently bring down enemy soldiers. Penetration is also sadly deficient. Even light barriers are not perforated by this rifle/cartridge combination.' [12.]

Additional observations of the impotence of the 5.56mm round soon appeared in official and professional publications. In their official briefing 'Lessons Learned in Afghanistan' dated April 2002, LTC C. Dean, USA and SFC S. Newland, USA of the U. S. Army Natick Soldier Center reported: 'Soldiers asked for a weapon with a larger round. 'So it will drop a man with one shot.'' In the October 2002 issue of the Marine Corps Gazette magazine, Capt Philip Treglia, USMC reflected on his Afghanistan experience in December 2001 by reporting that, 'the 5.56 mm round will not put a man to the ground with two shots to the chest.' Capt Treglia's men were trained to fire two bullets into an enemy's chest and if that did not knock him down, they were to shift fire to the head. This is the corrective action implemented for these Marines and many others in the Armed Forces for the impotent 5.56mm cartridge rather than equipping them with a rifle that fired a bullet with one—round knockdown power. And, as Capt Treglia reported, multiple hits with the 5.56mm bullet didn't work any better in Afghanistan than it did anytime in the past.

In a 3 March 2003 written briefing, LCdr. Gary K. Roberts, USNR recommended to RAdm. Albert M. Calland, Commander, Naval Special Warfare (NSW) Command that he upgrades his command's 5.56mm weapons to the 6.8mm cartridge. That briefing, entitled, 'Enhancement of NSW Carbine & Rifle Capability,' opens by observing:

Recent combat operations have highlighted terminal performance problems, generally manifested as failures to rapidly incapacitate opponents, during combat operations when M855 62gr. 'Green Tip' FMJ is fired from 5.56mm rifles and carbines. Failure to rapidly incapacitate armed opponents increases the risk of U.S. forces being injured or killed and jeopardizes mission success. [13.]

That statement was prophetic.

On 12 September 2003, in Ar Ramadi, Iraq elements of the 3rd Battalion, 5th Special Forces Group engaged enemy forces in a firefight. An insurgent was struck in the torso by several rounds of 5.56mm ammunition from their M—4 carbines (this is the current shortened version of the M—16 Service Rifle). He continued to fire his AK—47 and mortally wounded MSgt Kevin N. Morehead, age 33, from Little Rock, Arkansas. The engagement continued with the same insurgent surprising SFC William M. Bennett, age 35, from Seymour, Tennessee from a hiding place and killing him instantly with a three—round burst to the head and neck. SSgt Robert E Springer, threw away his M—4 carbine, drew an obsolete WWI/WWII vintage .45 caliber pistol and killed the insurgent with one shot. A close inspection of the enemy's corpse revealed that he had been hit by seven 5.56 mm rounds in his torso. Also, in this engagement, these soldiers were provided with a commercially produced 5.56mm round of 77—grain weight vice the 62—grain bullets in use by general—purpose forces. Obviously, the larger 5.56mm round was of little consequence. [14.]



These reports are consistent with my own experience during three tours of duty in Vietnam from the goat incident in 1964 described above to service with the 3rd Marine Division in 1968—69; experience that repeatedly reminded me that this 5.56mm cartridge was nothing more than the full—metal jacket military version of the commercial .223 caliber Remington cartridge. The .223 caliber Remington was and is today commercially advertised and sold as a 'varmint cartridge' for hunting groundhogs, prairie dogs and woodchucks. The cartridge is offered with soft point, hollow point, fragmentation, or projectiles incorporating two or more of these attributes to enhance its lethality and assure a 'clean kill': one—round knockdown power on varmints. States such as the Commonwealth of Virginia do not permit it to be used for hunting deer or bear because its lethality—with or without those enhancements——does not assure a 'clean kill' on big game. [15] Yet, its full metal jacket military counterpart continues to be issued to American warriors in spite of almost 40 years of Lessons Learned that enemy soldiers continue to fire their weapons and have even killed our soldiers after sustaining multiple hits from 5.56mm bullets.

The lethality of the 5.56mm cartridge, sold on lies, cannot be fixed in truth. It is time the Department of Defense recognizes this 'Big Lie' from the Vietnam War and in the names of MSgt Kevin N. Morehead and SFC William M. Bennett replaces this varmint cartridge with one that gives our warriors that critical capability described by SFC Paul Howe above——one—round knockdown power!

The author's 25—year Marine career included service as an infantryman and intelligence officer with highlights of three tours of duty in Vietnam and, ultimately, representing the Defense Intelligence Agency as a briefer to the Chairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff, the Secretary of Defense and other Washington area decision makers. He currently manages MILINET an Internet forum on international political/military affairs.
1. Bowden, M, Black Hawk Down, Penguin Books, 2000, p. 208.
2. Fackler, ML,"Wounding patterns of military rifle bullets," International Defense Review, January 1989, pp. 59—64.
3. Ezell, EC & Stevens, RB, The Black Rifle, M16 Retrospective, Collector Grade Publications, Inc., 1994, p. 98.
4. Ibid. pp.99—100.
5. Ibid. pp.101—106.
6. Ibid. pp. 106—107.
7. Ibid. p. 116.
8. Hitler, A, Mein Kampf. James Murphy, translator. London, New York, Melbourne: Hurst and Blackett Ltd; April 1942; page 134.
9. Moore, Col. HG, 'After Action Report, Ian Drang Valley Operation 1st Battalion, 7th Cavalry 14—16 November 1965,' dated, 9 December 1965, p. 8.
10. Hayworth, Col. J, E—Mail to author, 23 April 2002.
11. Feldmeier, Maj. H, E—Mail to author, 21 May 2002.
12. Anonymous, E—Mail to MILINET, 26 March 2002.
13. Roberts, USNR, LCdr. Gary K., Brief to RAdm Albert M. Calland, CMDR NAVSPECWARCOM, 'Enhancement of NSW Carbine & Rifle Capability' brief, 3 March 2003.
14. Jones, Bruce L., 'MILINET: Case Studies in Combat Failures of 5.56mm Ammunition,' 3 November 2003
15. http://www.dgif.state.va.us/hunting/reg ... l#legaluse



¿Qué os parece?
Nunca digas que éste es mi último sendero
**
podcast de portierramaryaire
https://www.ivoox.com/podcast-portierra ... 223_1.html

y recuerda nuestro patreon para actualizar el foro y crecer
https://www.patreon.com/portierramaryaire
Avatar de Usuario
poliorcetes
Site Admin
 
Mensajes: 11146
Registrado: Vie Abr 17, 2009 11:54 am

Re: ¿Es el 5.56 OTAN suficiente para nuestros soldados?

Notapor kenji el Jue Sep 03, 2009 11:08 am

Buscando informacion sobre lo que dices, he encontrado esta información.

Es evidente que el 5.56 gana en tamaño, peso, agilidad y que el 7.62 tiene la ventaja de su pegada, ahora bien, no es lo mismo usar un arma en una lucha urbana que en campo abierto.

Me imagino que los que lo usen tendran sus preferencias(que opinen los profesionales) aunque veo lo que si veo dificil es que un ejercito pueda mantener las dos cosas a la vez, aunque desde luego seria la solucion ideal.


ESTUDIO COMPARATIVO DE LOS CALIBRES 7,62X51 MM Y 5,56X45 MM.
Designaremos algunos parametros mas importantes desde el punto de vista tactico, logistico y tecnico que estan intimamente ligados con la eficacia del combatiente. Para esta comparacion se tomara como base las siguientes armas

Armas de asalto
SIG 542 Cal. 7.62
M-16 A2 Cal. 5.56
Armas de apoyo de combate
F.A. Rheinmetal Cal. 7.62
Amet. Liv. Cal. 5.56

Armas de asalto
a. Factores de peso , dimension y cadencia
1-. Peso del arma
SIG 542 M-16 A2
Calibre 7.62mm..................................... 5.56mm.
Peso sin cargador 3.83 kg.....................3.6 kg.
Capacidad del cargador 20 tiros........... 30 tiros
Peso cargador vacio 0.24 kg. ................0.11 kg.
Peso cargador lleno 0.73 kg...................0.45 kg.
Peso total 4.56 kg.................................. 4.05 kg.

Haciendo un analisis de los pesos , tanto de las armas como de los cargadores, se puede concluir que no existen diferencias apreciables en cuanto a los pesos de las armas; solo existen diferencias en los pesos de los cargadores, siendo de menor peso el cargador de Cal. 5.56 mm. Que tiene mayor capacidad que los utilizados en las armas Cal. 7.62 mm. Esto permite al combatiente portar una mayor dotacion de municion

Dimensiones del arma
SIG 542 M-16A2
Cal. 7.62 5.56
Longitud del arma (mm.) 1002........................................... 1000
No existe diferencias apreciables en cuanto a las dimensiones de las armas en estudio.

Cadencia de fuego
SIG 542 M-16A2
Cadencia de fuego (disp./min) 650-800.............................. 650-940
Capac. Cargador (Tiros) 20.......................................30
Peso cargador (Kg.) 0.73.................................... 0.45
La cadencia de fuego del fusil de menor calibre es muy superior a la del fusil de asalto de calibre 7.62 mm. Desde el punto de vista logistico, el combatiente que utiliza un fusil de reducido calibre podra llevar mayor cantidad de minucion por su reducido peso y tamaño, lo que le dara en combate una mayor superioridad en cuanto a poder de fuego sobre su adversario que utiliza un fusil 7.62

Factores de Comparacion logistico

Peso de la primera dotacion de municion
SIG 542 M-16A2
Peso 1 . era dot. (kg.) 6.213 3.502

El combatiente debe transportar 200 cartuchos como la 1.era ditacion para el fusil de asalto, conforme con el siguiente detalle:
-5 cargadores con 20 tiros c/u , lo que hace un total de 100 tiros
-100 tiros que transporta en su mochila de asalto.
Podemos concluir que con la misma cantidad de municion el combatiente que transporta municion 5.56 mm. Lo hace practicamente a la mitad del peso de aquel que transporta mun. Calibre 7.62 mm.

Peso de la segunda dotacion de municion
SIG 542 M-16A2
Peso 2.da dot. (kg.) 4085 2272

La 2da. Dotacion de municion es transportada por la unidad logistica, por lo tanto se analizara el peso de la dotacion de municion para las armas de asalto y apoyo de combate.

Factores de comparacion Tecnica:
Energia remanente
SIG 542...........................................................M-16A2
Municion (mm.) 7.62x51.................................................... 5.56x45
Peso proyectil 9.6 grs......................................................... 4 grs.
Calibre 7.62 5.56
Veloc. Inic. (m/seg) 815...................................................... 930
Veloc. Remanente a 300 mts. 617.42................................. 689.54
Energia remanente a 300 mts. 186.71 kgs......................... 94.5 kgs
Veloc. Remanente a 600 mts. 458.48................................... 479.53
Energia remanente a 600 mts. 102.96 kgs.......................... 46.93 kgs.

Energia remanente es aquella energia que tiene el proyectil al pasar por un punto cualquiera de la trayectoria. La energia remanente es uno de los parametros mas importantes de la balistica exterior, que es la ciencia que estudia el movimiento del proyectil en la atmosfera desde que dejan de actuar los gases en el proyectil hasta que este llega a su objetivo.
Confrontadas las energias remanentes para la distancia normal de combate de 300 metros de los proyectiles cal. 7.62 y 5.56, disparados por fusiles de asalto y armas de apoyo de combate, encontramos que la diferencia de porcentaje arroja un mejor rendimiento en los proyectiles 7.62mm con un 50% respecto a los proyectiles 5.56mm . Observando las energias remanentes a los 600 mts. De distancia, ambos calibres disparados por fusiles de asalto y armas de apoyo de combate, demuestran que el cal. 7.62mm es superior al cal. 5.56 mm en un 55% con repecto al cal. 5.56 mm.
Cabe hacer presente que la energia remanente necesaria para dar de baja a un adversario es de 8.16 kgm(80N); por lo tanto ambos proyectiles a las distancias de 300 mts. Y 600 mts. Poseen la energia remanente necesaria para cumplir dicho objetivo.

Poder de detencion
SIG 542 M-16A2
Sin importancia 0 5 kg x cm2
Con ligero shock 5 10 kg x cm2
De bastante consideracion 10 15 kg x cm2
De gravedad 15 o mas kg x cm2


Armamento
SIG 542 M-16A2
Municion (mm.) 7.62 x 51 5.56 x 45
Energia rem. a 300 mts. (kgm) 187 95
Pod. Det. A 300 mts. 71 26 kg x cm2
Energia rem. A 600 mts. (kgm) 103 47
Pod. Det. A 600 mts. 39 13 kg x cm2

El poder de detencion se define como la medida del efecto producido en un blanco animado al impactar un proyectil en cualquier parte de este, y siempre que quede en el blanco.
Teniendo como base los estudios experimentales de efctos producidos por impactos de proyectiles medidos en poder de detencion, obtuvimos los siguientes resultados.
Tomando en cuenta la tabla experimental de efectos producidos en un blanco, podemos concluir que a la distancia de 300 mts. Ambos proyectiles producen efectos de gravedad en el adversario. A la distancia de 600 mts. Los efectos de los proyectiles de pequeño calibre son solo de consideracion, no produciendo la muerte necesariamente.
En cuanto a los proyectiles de mayor calibre 7.60 mm. A la distancia de 600 mts. Se producen heridas de gravedad y por ende altas probabilidades de causar la muerte del adversario.

ARMAS DE APOYO DE COMBATE

Factores de peso, dimension y cadencia
Peso del arma
F.A. Rh. Amet. Liv.
Calibre 7.62 mm 5.56 mm
Peso del arma (kg) 11.5 5.8
Peso cañon (kg.) 1.8 1.0
Peso cinta c/250 t (kg.) 6.7 -.-
Peso caja c/200 t (kg.) -.- 3.0
Peso total (kg.) 20.0 9.8

Se puede apreciar que la diferencia de peso entre estas armas es considerable, lo que pone de manifiesto la superioridad de la ametralladora ligera, puesto que ademas de cumplir las misiones clasicas de esta arma, puede ser usada en operaciones especiales, operaciones aerotransportadas, patrullas de combate o reconocimiento, etc.



Dimensiones del arma
F.A. Rh. Amet. Liv
Calibre (mm.) 7.62 5.56
Longitud del arma (mm.) 1225 950

Existen diferencias notables en cuanto a las dimensiones de la ametralladora ligera con respecto a la Rh; por consiguiente, este tipo de arma cal. 5.56 mm. Es mas manuable, facil de manejar, de transportar y se puede disparar con comodidad, tanto desde el hombro como desde la cintura, cualidades que no posee el fusil ametralladora Rh

Cadencia de fuego
F.A. Rh. Amet. Liv
Calibre (mm.) 7.62 5.56
Cad. De fuego (D/min) 1000 1000

La cadencia de fuego del arma de apoyo de menor calibre es muy superior a la del arma de mayor calibre. Desde el punto de vista logistico, el combatiente que utiliza el arma de apoyo de menor calibre, podra llevar mayor cantidad de municion por su reducido peso y tamaño, lo que le dara en combate mayor poder de fuego sobre el adversario que utiliza un fusil cal. 7.62 mm.

Factores de comparacion logistico

Peso de la 1ra dotacion de municion
F.A. Rh. Amet. Liv
Calibre 7.62 5.56
Peso 1era dot. mun. (kg.) 25.625 12.0
La primera dotacion de municion para este tipo de arma es de 1000 tiros, que son transportados por el apuntador y municionero.
De esto se desprende que con la misma cantidad de municion (1000 tiros), el combatiente que transporta la municion 5.56 mm. Lo hace con un menor peso del orden del 50% respecto al combatiente que transporta municion cal 7.62 mm.

Peso de la 2da. dotacion de municion
F.A. Rh. Amet. Liv
Calibre 7.62 5.56
Peso 2da dot. mun. (kg.) 2451 1376
Se concluye que con la misma cantidad de municion la unidad logistica que transporta municion del 5.56 mm. Lo hace practicamente a la mitad del peso .


Volumen de la 2da. dotacion de municion
F.A. Rh. Amet. Liv
Calibre 7.62 5.56
Volumen 2da dot. mun. (m3.) 1.995 1.032
Se concluye que la unidad logistica que transporta municion 5.56 mm lo hace a la mitad el volumen que al tranportar municion 7.62 mm.


Factores de comparacion Tecnica:
Energia remanente
F.A Rh. Amet. Liv.
Municion (mm.) 7.62x51 5.56x45
Peso proyectil 9.6 grs. 4 grs.
Calibre 7.62 5.56
Veloc. Inic. (m/seg) 820 870
Veloc. Remanente a 300 mts. 621.62 629.87
Energia remanente a 300 mts. 189.26 kgs 80.97 kgs
Veloc. Remanente a 600 mts. 461.75 442.86
Energia remanente a 600 mts. 104.43 kgs. 40.03 kgs

Realizado el estudio de las energias se obtuvo el resultado aquí­ indicado.
Confrontadas las energias remanentes para la distancia normal de combate (300 mts.) de los proyectiles 7.62 mm. Y 5.56 mm. Disparados por fusiles de asalto y armas de apoyo de combate, encontramos que las diferencias de porcentajes arroja un mejor rendimiento en los proyectiles cal. 7.62 mm. Con un 50% respecto a los proyectiles cal. 5.56 mm.
Observando las energias remanentes a 600 mts. De distancia ambos proyectiles disparados por fusiles de asalto y armas de apoyo de combate, demuestran que el cal. 7.62 mm. Es superior en un 55% con respecto al cal. 5.56 mm.
Cabe hacer presente que la energia remanente necesaria para dar de baja a un adversario es de 8.16 kgm (80 N), por lo tanto ambos proyectiles a las distanciasw de 300 mts. Y 600 mts. Poseen la energia remanente necesaria para cumplir dicho objetivo.

Conclusion
Una vez evaluados los factores de comparacion, podemos concluir que el conjunto arma-municion 5.56x45 mm. Cumple en mejor forma con las exigencias tacticas , logisticas y tecnicas a la distancia normal de combate definidas por la OTAN.
Ambos conjunto arma-municion (7.62x51 mm. Y 5.56x 45 mm.)poseen bondades y restricciones, por lo que es necesario realizar un estudio mas profundo de este controvertido tema, con el proposito de reflexionar y posteriormente definir algunas interrogantes:
-Cual es la distancia normal de combate para las armas de asalto y apoyo de combate de anima estriada considerada por la infanteria de nuestro Ejercito.
-Una vez definida la distancia normal de combate en funcion del escenario, cual seria el alcance eficaz que necesitan las armas de asalto y apoyo de combate.
-Definir lo mas conveniente en cuanto a producirle al adversario mayor cantidad de bajas en heridos y muertes.
-Considerando un escenario belico con una dificil geografia se deberia reflexionar, desde el punto de vista logistico, sobre la conveniencia de un apoyo logistico eficaz, referido al peso de la primera dotacion de municion que es transportada por el combatiente y el peso y el volumen de la segunda dotacion de municion que es transportada por las unidades logisticas.
Analizadas estas interrogantes y otras que surjan de un estudio acabado y posteriormente definidos los parametros precitados, podremos determinar el conjunto arma-municion mas conveniente para nuestro ejercito

Extraido de A&S
Avatar de Usuario
kenji
 
Mensajes: 350
Registrado: Sab Oct 08, 2005 5:37 pm

Re: ¿Es el 5.56 OTAN suficiente para nuestros soldados?

Notapor CENTURION el Jue Sep 03, 2009 11:16 am

Para llegar a la conclusión que todos sabemos, el 5,56 para combate cercano 300-350m y el 7,62, para el mismo combate cercano y más allá.
Y como todos sabeí­s cual es mi preferencia en calibres, 300 wm, 338 lapua o 408 Chey Tac, el 5,56mm me parece una aguja. :twisted:

Saludos
Avatar de Usuario
CENTURION
Expulsado
 
Mensajes: 5134
Registrado: Mar May 20, 2008 1:24 pm
Ubicación: ¿A quien le importa ??

Re: ¿Es el 5.56 OTAN suficiente para nuestros soldados?

Notapor A.M.E. Nº 4 el Jue Sep 03, 2009 6:23 pm

Pregunta clara y concisa.

Un elemento se escuda detras de un barril de 200 litros de agua, a 200 o 250 mts. cual de los 2 calibres lo atraviesa :?:

Pués el que lo atraviese con ese es el que se tiene que trabajar.

Saludos cordiales.

NOTA: El que no sirve para matar servira para que lo maten. (Teniente Comandante de mi compañí­a)
El camino es creer que la Paz es posible, trabajar por conseguirla es transitar por él

Imagen
Avatar de Usuario
A.M.E. Nº 4
 
Mensajes: 5582
Registrado: Lun Dic 25, 2006 11:49 am
Ubicación: Malaga (España)

Re: ¿Es el 5.56 OTAN suficiente para nuestros soldados?

Notapor CENTURION el Jue Sep 03, 2009 7:21 pm

Sin lugar a dudas el 7,62.
Avatar de Usuario
CENTURION
Expulsado
 
Mensajes: 5134
Registrado: Mar May 20, 2008 1:24 pm
Ubicación: ¿A quien le importa ??

Re: ¿Es el 5.56 OTAN suficiente para nuestros soldados?

Notapor A.M.E. Nº 4 el Jue Sep 03, 2009 8:17 pm

Pues si es el 7,62, ha trabajar con él, entiendo que ese tipo de fusiles de asalto pueden pesar más, pero con los materiales que existen hoy en dí­a, es posible hacer un buen fusil de asalto de este calibre, por que cuando se cuecen las habas de verdad, todo lo que se tenga es poco.

Esa es mi opinión,

Saludos cordiales.
El camino es creer que la Paz es posible, trabajar por conseguirla es transitar por él

Imagen
Avatar de Usuario
A.M.E. Nº 4
 
Mensajes: 5582
Registrado: Lun Dic 25, 2006 11:49 am
Ubicación: Malaga (España)

Re: ¿Es el 5.56 OTAN suficiente para nuestros soldados?

Notapor poliorcetes el Jue Sep 03, 2009 8:27 pm

Por no hablar de que hay métodos probados, desde bocachas hasta amortiguadores, que harí­an controlable el retroceso. Por otro lado está el peso de la munición, y que el 7.62 tampoco garantiza incapacitar con un solo impacto, pero amos, las diferencias son considerables.

Mi duda es por el tzahal. Emplean el 5.56 desde justo después de Yom Kippur 73, y no tienen prisa por dejarlo. Claro que tienen una buena base industrial con la que venden a otros paí­ses, y que el tipo de jarana en la que se suelen meter es diferente a las que se meten los gringos: ni tienen que cubrir terrenos enormes, ni con poca gente. Digo yo que por eso la diferencia no se notará tanto, que en la mayorí­a de los casos lo que no le faltará al interfecto son pildorazos.

Además, después de años experimentando con cañones cortos (hasta 10" por los armeros pasados de rosca de algunas unidades), con el tavor vuelven a tamaños más respetables de cañón y, con ello, más velocidad.

En cualquier caso, sigo sin entender cómo los infantes de los ejércitos del primer mundo no tienen lo mejor disponible
Nunca digas que éste es mi último sendero
**
podcast de portierramaryaire
https://www.ivoox.com/podcast-portierra ... 223_1.html

y recuerda nuestro patreon para actualizar el foro y crecer
https://www.patreon.com/portierramaryaire
Avatar de Usuario
poliorcetes
Site Admin
 
Mensajes: 11146
Registrado: Vie Abr 17, 2009 11:54 am

Re: ¿Es el 5.56 OTAN suficiente para nuestros soldados?

Notapor A.M.E. Nº 4 el Jue Sep 03, 2009 8:34 pm

Cuando hice el Servicio Militar en el año 81/82, yo tiraba con el CETME C, y eso es "Gloria Vitoria".

Y si le colocas una mira de esas que están colocando en los HK, hacen diana los que tení­an miedo de disparar, a ver si os acordaí­s los que nos llevaban al tiro el canguelo y los espaldarazos cuando se tiraba de rodillas.

Saludos cordiales.
El camino es creer que la Paz es posible, trabajar por conseguirla es transitar por él

Imagen
Avatar de Usuario
A.M.E. Nº 4
 
Mensajes: 5582
Registrado: Lun Dic 25, 2006 11:49 am
Ubicación: Malaga (España)

Re: ¿Es el 5.56 OTAN suficiente para nuestros soldados?

Notapor CENTURION el Jue Sep 03, 2009 9:24 pm

Lo del Tzahal es lógico, combates CQB y urbanos ,para eso el 5,56 las armas más cortas y mayor capacidad de munición, ahora usa el Tavor a más de 300 m y verás ,vendes tu alma por el Galil de 7,62mm, que encima tiene menos retroceso que el FAL, o el G-3 y si le pones el cargador recto tienes 25 disparos.

Saludos
Avatar de Usuario
CENTURION
Expulsado
 
Mensajes: 5134
Registrado: Mar May 20, 2008 1:24 pm
Ubicación: ¿A quien le importa ??

Re: ¿Es el 5.56 OTAN suficiente para nuestros soldados?

Notapor poliorcetes el Jue Sep 03, 2009 10:03 pm

Cualquier galil actual está en manos de reservistas de segundo escalón, con la sóla excepción de los de blindados. Y ojo, ningún FUSA a pelo, sin optimizar, está pensado para ser usado a más de 300 metros. No puedo citar la fuente porque no la recuerdo, pero hay un análisis por ahí­ cristalino: si hay jarana y la gente empieza a correr para ponerse a cubierto, contando la pérdida de velocidad de cualquier munición militar hay que tener en cuenta lo que corre un tipo en medio segundo. Si a eso le sumamos una precisión muy por encima de los 2MOA, acertar a alguien con un FUSA por encima de 300 metros es por aproximación y a base de regar el terreno, siendo lo más probable que llegue a cubierto y se agache (lo que es lo suyo en la mayorí­a de los casos, para luego emplear algo más contundente).

Con todo, me llama la atención que el Army casi haya estandarizado el M4 y su cañón de 14". No tengo la cifra a mano, pero creo que por encima de 50 metros empieza a bajar la % de fragmentación, y casi seguro que no fragmenta por encima de 100. Si no fragmenta, el pildorazo es poco más que un .22, y eso es jugar con la vida de los infantes, que en muchos casos no pueden tener la seguridad de que han incapacitado al vecino.
Nunca digas que éste es mi último sendero
**
podcast de portierramaryaire
https://www.ivoox.com/podcast-portierra ... 223_1.html

y recuerda nuestro patreon para actualizar el foro y crecer
https://www.patreon.com/portierramaryaire
Avatar de Usuario
poliorcetes
Site Admin
 
Mensajes: 11146
Registrado: Vie Abr 17, 2009 11:54 am

Re: ¿Es el 5.56 OTAN suficiente para nuestros soldados?

Notapor CENTURION el Jue Sep 03, 2009 10:07 pm

No tengo la cifra a mano, pero creo que por encima de 50 metros empieza a bajar la % de fragmentación, y casi seguro que no fragmenta por encima de 100


Sube a las dos cifras 25 m. y estarás acertado.
Avatar de Usuario
CENTURION
Expulsado
 
Mensajes: 5134
Registrado: Mar May 20, 2008 1:24 pm
Ubicación: ¿A quien le importa ??

Re: ¿Es el 5.56 OTAN suficiente para nuestros soldados?

Notapor bayeaux el Jue Sep 03, 2009 10:35 pm

¿Y qué tal el fusil Barret M468 con balas de calibre 6,8 mm?
Bala de buena masa y rápida, implica gran energí­a cinética, te detiene y te mata.
bayeaux
 
Mensajes: 532
Registrado: Mar Dic 30, 2008 10:14 pm

Re: ¿Es el 5.56 OTAN suficiente para nuestros soldados?

Notapor CENTURION el Vie Sep 04, 2009 1:08 am

El M468, es posiblemente el fusil de asalto del futuro, combina la ligereza del 5,56, con la pegada del 7,62 y cualquiera que haya disparado con la familia M,y en especial con el M-4, maneja perfectamente el M468, su retroceso es igual al del 5,56, pero la potencia es mayor, casi el 50% más.

No es un rifle nuevo, Barret se limita a hacer el receptor superior y el inferior es el de M-16/ M-4
con el que comparte casi todas las piezas,

Saludos
Avatar de Usuario
CENTURION
Expulsado
 
Mensajes: 5134
Registrado: Mar May 20, 2008 1:24 pm
Ubicación: ¿A quien le importa ??

Re: ¿Es el 5.56 OTAN suficiente para nuestros soldados?

Notapor NOSTROMO el Vie Sep 04, 2009 1:38 am

Siento ser un fulano tan pesimista, pero a 200 metros en combate no le dan ni a un elefante...

Chavales 200 metros son metros a diós....

y que nadie me venga con que a 200 metros le mete un tiro entre ceja y ceja a David el Gnomo... El fusilero medio de cualquier ejercito es razonablemente preciso a 150 metros, muy pocos a 200, y a 300 ya mejor ni hablamos. Para esas distancias llevas en las sección a un tirador selecto (Ojo, no un francotirador que eso es otro rollo), que con su fusil de 7,62 se maneja entre los 250 y los 450 metros NO MAS ALLA :a7 .

Si alguien me dice cual es el rango de tiro efetivo de un fusilero en IRAK o AFGANISTAN se lleva un premio... Buscad por que es la respuesta a la pregunta de porque a los ejercitos no les preocupa el asunto del calibre por ahora.

Por cierto no me valen unidades especiales, hablo del fusaca de tota la vita... mejor ya ni hablamos de personal de segunda lí­nea (CG, artillerí­a, Grupo Logí­stico....).

Para tirar a más de 200 te hacen falta tres cosas como mí­nimo:

A) haber tirado MUCHA munición sabiendo lo que haces, conociendo la técnica del tiro, y sobre todo tomándote la molestia de a TU fusil ajustarle las miras... y no a 100 metros (distancia del 90% de los campos de tiro militar de España por ejemplo...).
B) tunear el fusa, ponerle una mira por ejemplo (el HK de tierra solo tiene 1,5 aumentos, y el nuestro 3 y está bien para un fusilero pero para nada más), y sobre todo, que no te lo cambien cuando vas a Afganistán, y que tu fusa tuneado se quede en casita :shock: ...
C) haber visto suficiente tomate como para cuando lo tienes que usar de verdad, controles razonablemente tus nervios y puedas elegir un objetivo y teniendo una buena posición te decidas a darle a más de 150 metros...

mejor no os cuento que está demostrado que excepto gente muy entrenada una persona normal con una pipa no le da a un tio a 10 METROS 8) ... (datos reales).

Además, el fusilero de hoy en dí­a, con tanta asimetrí­a que hay (y tanta playstation...) aprieta el gatillo tela, por lo que lo que más se carga ya sabeis lo que es... MUNICIí“N, CUANTA MíS MEJOR ..... JAJAJAJAJAJAJA..... :c4

Mi último viaje a una zona con personal español desplegado, me decí­a un oficial de enlace que nos pusieron que la gente quemaba munición a tope (en parte por lo nervios de no saber a donde tirar, cuando tienes a un tio y lo ves normalmente o gasta tanto...)

:b6
Avatar de Usuario
NOSTROMO
 
Mensajes: 514
Registrado: Sab Dic 08, 2007 10:01 pm

Re: ¿Es el 5.56 OTAN suficiente para nuestros soldados?

Notapor CENTURION el Vie Sep 04, 2009 9:31 am

Estoy de acuerdo contigo, pero es lo que tiene generalizar.

Si alguien me dice cual es el rango de tiro efetivo de un fusilero en IRAK o AFGANISTAN se lleva un premio..


En Afganistán 75 -100m, no contando los disparos largos de Sniper por ejemplo y en Irak 50-75 m.
Lo del fusilero normal, lo has explicado perfectamente, que es algo que olvido fácilmente siempre los comparo con gente como nosotros ,con experiencia, vamos que olvido las diferencias.

Saludos
Avatar de Usuario
CENTURION
Expulsado
 
Mensajes: 5134
Registrado: Mar May 20, 2008 1:24 pm
Ubicación: ¿A quien le importa ??

Siguiente

Volver a Ejércitos de tierra

¿Quién está conectado?

Usuarios navegando por este Foro: No hay usuarios registrados visitando el Foro y 9 invitados